Friday Feature – Andrew Wyeth #wyeth #art


 

Friday Feature is Back this Fall. Enjoy a month of Art!!!

Friday Feature art

wyeth

After enjoying the Andrew Wyeth exhibit at the National Gallery, I fell in love with this artist. As a student of art (and art history), I have been in love with Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Monet, Degas, and several locally renowned artists.

Why do we love art or their creators?

Well I can say with Monet it was because I would dream of the places he painted. Degas it was the people he caught midstream in their daily life. With Wyeth, I feel I have been in those  places (some painful) and written about them. In many of his paintings, though there is no human presence, you feel something or someone there. Wyeth  creates from  emotion: Sorrow, elation, discovery were as much a part of his palette as the paint was. In reading more about Wyeth and his upbringing ,I could relate in part to his way with art; he was very secretive about his work and kept others from seeing him working for fear of being disconcerted and putting the project away. Growing up as the artist’s daughter, I felt the same trepidation. I realize now that it may not have been the fear of disapproval as much as it was the inability to produce. For from the artist’s hand something must flow or life becomes like a polluted dammed up stream. I realize why I have an instinctive love for Wyeth – he had to find his own niche as an artist away from his famous father.

andrew-wyeth

If you are familiar with his series of paintings Christina’s World than you also know that these paintings are inspired by a neighbor who had polio. His famous painting of her in the field is his depiction of her as she crawled in the field from one farm to the other. I am awed by his study of this woman. He gives a woman who lived her life in a wheelchair value during a time that such a woman would be easily overlooked (even degraded).

As I sat for hours looking at his work, I thought of Edgar Allen Poe’s writings where there are dark things hidden in the edges  of daylight. Wyeth’s angles remind me of the countless angles shot by Alfred Hitchcock – drawing the eye and imagination into a place they cannot escape. What lurks in Wyeth’s corners? What stories are left untold that can wander in our imagination weaving dark webs where retreat is impossible.

My artist mother has often conveyed that meaningful work comes out of trial, suffering, or hardship. For Wyeth it seemed pages of pastoral images fluttered forward: his father died and he entered a time where death emerged from his wheat fields. There seemed to be messengers speaking of death in his paintings. If I could interview Wyeth, I believe he would say that “growth of expression occurred.” An untested palette is just paint after all.

So I pose the question of the writer, the poet, the photographer: Has a difficulty or hardship caused your artistic expression to explode like the pine cone that sets forth its seeds of life during a consuming forest fire? Where/ when have you seen tremendous growth or change in your work?

Enjoy art for art’s sake and for the inspiration it offers.

“Never to suffer would never to have been blessed.”

~Edgar Allen Poe

Next week I have a special two part article of a french artist (Pierre Chalory) who painted 9/11. It’s been a delight to get to know this gifted artist. Check out Bold Magazine he is being featured in the September Issue!

 

 

All art work from WikiArt.Org WikiArt

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9 thoughts on “Friday Feature – Andrew Wyeth #wyeth #art

  1. You have a wonderful way of describing art and artists, I love looking at some of the paintings of famous artists, and I move on.I didn’t try to study it the way you do, this is how you and I are different. I loved reading about Wyeth,Degas, Monet and Edgar Allan Poe’s quote: “Never to suffer would never to have been blessed.”
    I think we all go through suffering in different ways, I do not think, God is partial towards anyone.

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    1. yes I agree that we all suffer and have not lived until we do. I don’t think I always enjoyed “studying” artists but I learned to enjoy it. Dear Ranu you are an eclectic being who loves and enjoys many things.

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  2. I live not far from Andrew Wyeth’s studio. During a tour of his studio a few years ago I was mesmerized by how much I learned about him from the contents of that small house. Each room told a specific story. If you are ever traveling near Chadds Ford,PA, I recommend the Brandywine River Museum, which has a vast Wyeth collection, and the studio tour.

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  3. Thank you.
    __ ‘Tis been a while since I’d seen -Christina’s World- I didn’t realize it was polio that had crippled her.
    __It never ceases to cause me to wonder that, with pastel chalks, oils, charcoal, water color, or pencil or pen… or with a typwriter for that matter… the clerity of feeling with which an artist shows what they see; other seers see as the artist saw, then they may see beyond. _m

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  4. This is a fabulous post. I really enjoyed your perspective and learned things about Wyeth that I did not know. I do think that great art (of all forms) usually seems to have roots or inspiration in convulsively emotional events or situations.

    I also believe that nothing I have ever produced, words or photos, has had much oomph, and that is mainly because I am a flatliner. I experience neither highs nor lows. I have been lucky enough to not encounter life events that turned me upside down. My work lacks the passion that great art requires.

    Great topic.

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