Too Late #tanrenga #poetry

This month at Chevrefeuille’s Haiku Kai we are challenged by the Tan Renga that short chained poem written by two poets. Here is the haiku by Buson for your inspiration to create the second stanza of this Tan Renga.

Haiga by Buson

the willow leaves fallen,

the spring gone dry,
rocks here and there

© Yosa Buson (1716-1784)

tears blot candle lit message

death comes too quick for my love

~mdw

t

Repentant Magdalene - De La Tour 1640 oil

Art by Yosa Buson and Georges de la Tour

Summer Dreams #haiku #photography

suwari taru fune ni neteiru atsusa kana

in a boat grounded at low tide,
taking a nap
in the summer heat!

© Yosa Buson

block and tackle

swaying with the tide

my dreams roll with the waves

rope’s gentle tug

On a warm summer’s afternoon, it is easy to doze into a nap filled with dreams. The prompt at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai is Nap

Memory #haiku #moon

yabu- iri ya  mamori- bukuro o  wasure kusa

Apprentice’s holiday:
a good-luck amulet
forgotten in the grass

© Buson

moonshine

waiting all year

dance to the memory

full moon in her eyes

This Carpe Diem Haiku Kai prompt is in celebration of a holiday that the servants were given: “Yabu-iri” literally “thicket-entering,” is an obscure season marker in haiku for spring (or late New Year). On about the sixteenth of the first month, servants and apprentices were allowed to go home for a short visit. This would have meant that the holiday started  with the full moon.

 

Beyond the Gate #haiku #photography

Life's gate

“Of all languages, Japanese is by far the richest in onomatopoeic elements, especially of the simpler variety, in which the sound of the word is directly an imitation of the thing.
I had never heard of onomatopoeia until I discovered haiku in the late eighties, but I learned through the years that haiku are made, written, composed for saying aloud twice (or more times). Haiku are written down but the essence of haiku is this onomatopoeia. How we say a thing is of more importance, of more significance, than what we say, the conscious meaning; for through the tones of the voice, the words chosen, their combination, the sounds echoing and reechoing one another, their concords suspended and reestablished, their discords sustained and resolved, through all this there is a music as free and yet as law-abiding as is that of the flute, the oboe and the violin.
Japanese is a language of sounds as we can see in the three-lined form of haiku with its 5-7-5 sound-units (or onji). Japanese people are part of nature, they are one with the sounds of nature and therefor haiku became what it is … the poetry of nature …”

~Kristjann Panneman

hi wa hi kure yo yo wa yo ake yo to naku kaeru

“day, ah, darken day!

night, ah, dawn away!”
chant the frogs

© Buson

We may summarize the function of onomatopoeia in the following way:

1.) The direct representation of the sounds of the outside world by the sounds of the voice;

 

2.) The representation of movement, or physical sensations other than that of sound;

 

3.) The representation of soul states. This is always indirect, unconscious, spontaneous. Great poetry depends chiefly for its effect upon this factor. It cannot be imitated or artificially produced;

 

clear drops

open the gate

she bubbles to life

*

*

The haiku writing lesson is courtesy of Kristjaan Panneman at Chevrefeuilles Carpe Diem.

I am currently drawing the above gate.

Drawing

hand in active pursuit

eye joins in

gate 2

Caught in the Storm #haiku #photography #poem

rainy day walkend of the day’s walk

thunder warns of storm’s promise

no short-cut

***

The prompt for Chevrefeuillle’s Carpe Diem is Short- Cut inspired by this haiku by Buson:

chikamichi ya mizu fumi wataru satsukiame

on the shortcut path,

stepping through water to cross the meadow
in the summer rains.

I wrote another poetic offering for the thunder and lightening show today.

Life Giving Green #aomugi #haiku #health #spring

raindrops on barley

This haiku (in bold) is written by Sono-jo, a haiku poetess and pupil of Buson on grasses and leaves in Spring:

te wo nobete ori-yuku haru no kusaki kani

as I go along,

stretching out my hand and plucking
the grasses and leaves of Spring

**

 Catch the waving breeze

green head of the barley wheat

growing ever strong

*

growing ever strong

feed to those needing health

reviving spirits

*

reviving spirits

need for life’s flow in and through

spring lives in  our eyes

Thanks to Carpe Diem’s prompt of the health giving Aomugi or green barley. may spring bring health and vitality to all!