Bzzzzz #haiku

Bee

a mark on the world

flower offers a yellow kiss

spring’s exclamation

Here’s one for the bees (who people so often run away from). These little creatures diligently keep our world alive.

Our host at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai has once again offered a wonderful prompt.
bee by aussiegall

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Cherry Blossom Carried Away

petal walk

such a malice
cherry blossoms in full bloom
the Spring wind!

© Chèvrefeuille

scattered at my feet

arctic cold grasps pink innocence

spring picks up pieces

 

children dance around her

adults gather in sad fare well

hands full of beauty

her essence floats off in the basin

tears mist away

faintest pink remains

brown and bruised by the wind

© L. Moon

My Cherry Blossom offering to Carpe Diem as a Solo No Renga

And with Poets United as we celebrate the Cherry Blossom

a touch of cherry

Everyone feels grief
when cherry blossoms scatter.
Might they then be tears–
those drops of moisture falling
in the gentle rains of spring? 
For those of you poets who have not submitted yet,  we would love your poems/haiku  to encourage the orphans of Ebola. To those who have thank you !!!
A teen from the Philipines submitted a beautiful poem today I was so humbled by her desire to help.

Borrowing Sleep’s Step #haiku #tanrenga #photography

waves of snow

borrowing sleep

from the scarecrow’s sleeves
midnight frost

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

 

sleepwalker’s nightly path

no one knows where you go

~mdw

 

 

I am reminded of my son’s odd sleepwalking habits. He seemed to have a path that he always followed (it always ended on the stairs). It got longer as he got older; The neighbors would often find him asleep on their stairs.

 

The Carpe Diem prompt is to write a Tan Renga using Basho’s fine haiku.

Beyond the Gate #haiku #photography

Life's gate

“Of all languages, Japanese is by far the richest in onomatopoeic elements, especially of the simpler variety, in which the sound of the word is directly an imitation of the thing.
I had never heard of onomatopoeia until I discovered haiku in the late eighties, but I learned through the years that haiku are made, written, composed for saying aloud twice (or more times). Haiku are written down but the essence of haiku is this onomatopoeia. How we say a thing is of more importance, of more significance, than what we say, the conscious meaning; for through the tones of the voice, the words chosen, their combination, the sounds echoing and reechoing one another, their concords suspended and reestablished, their discords sustained and resolved, through all this there is a music as free and yet as law-abiding as is that of the flute, the oboe and the violin.
Japanese is a language of sounds as we can see in the three-lined form of haiku with its 5-7-5 sound-units (or onji). Japanese people are part of nature, they are one with the sounds of nature and therefor haiku became what it is … the poetry of nature …”

~Kristjann Panneman

hi wa hi kure yo yo wa yo ake yo to naku kaeru

“day, ah, darken day!

night, ah, dawn away!”
chant the frogs

© Buson

We may summarize the function of onomatopoeia in the following way:

1.) The direct representation of the sounds of the outside world by the sounds of the voice;

 

2.) The representation of movement, or physical sensations other than that of sound;

 

3.) The representation of soul states. This is always indirect, unconscious, spontaneous. Great poetry depends chiefly for its effect upon this factor. It cannot be imitated or artificially produced;

 

clear drops

open the gate

she bubbles to life

*

*

The haiku writing lesson is courtesy of Kristjaan Panneman at Chevrefeuilles Carpe Diem.

I am currently drawing the above gate.

Drawing

hand in active pursuit

eye joins in

gate 2

Desert Echo #haiku #tanrenga

cliff-dwelling-walnut-canyon-national-park-service1

ancient laughter
captured in a canyon wind –
yucca leaves, rustling

© Jen of Blog It Or Lose It

ancient laughter

captured in canyon wind

yucca leaves, rustling

~Jen

echoed conversation

wisdom of the ages

~mdw

This is Carpe Diem’s Tan Renga prompt for the weekend

If you are unfamiliar with the Tan Renga form,

the second “stanza” of 7-7 is an echo of another poet’s haiku