Too Late #tanrenga #poetry

This month at Chevrefeuille’s Haiku Kai we are challenged by the Tan Renga that short chained poem written by two poets. Here is the haiku by Buson for your inspiration to create the second stanza of this Tan Renga.

Haiga by Buson

the willow leaves fallen,

the spring gone dry,
rocks here and there

© Yosa Buson (1716-1784)

tears blot candle lit message

death comes too quick for my love

~mdw

t

Repentant Magdalene - De La Tour 1640 oil

Art by Yosa Buson and Georges de la Tour

Spring Showers #tanrenga #photography

 

morning glory!
the well bucket-entangled,
I ask for water

© Chiyo-Ni (1703-1775)

 

pink face welcomes sunny days

tears of heaven, silvery jewels

© mdw 2016

azalea in a drop

morning glory!
the well bucket-entangled,
I ask for water

rusty pail slips from my hands

 listen for the endless bottom

(ok I had to do something fun)

milk pail

The Tan Renga takes the verse of another (in this case Chiyo-Ni) as inspiration. The poet then adds two lines (7-7) to create a link between the two poets.

Chevrefeuilles Haiku Kai (hosted by Kristjaan Panneman) has prompted another  wonderful challenge for spring.

Plum Memory #tanrenga

plum fllowers

a child’s memory

sweet is her pink fruit smile

leg, hands and limbs (mdw)


where the waters flow afar
the village glows with sweet plum flowers
       (Anonymous)

 

The Tan Renga challenge (from Kristjaan Panneman) is to build a haiku off the two lined stanza. A great challenge as we usually build off the body of a poem in a Tan Renga – join us.

 

The photo was part of the Tan Renga prompt.

Borrowing Sleep’s Step #haiku #tanrenga #photography

waves of snow

borrowing sleep

from the scarecrow’s sleeves
midnight frost

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

 

sleepwalker’s nightly path

no one knows where you go

~mdw

 

 

I am reminded of my son’s odd sleepwalking habits. He seemed to have a path that he always followed (it always ended on the stairs). It got longer as he got older; The neighbors would often find him asleep on their stairs.

 

The Carpe Diem prompt is to write a Tan Renga using Basho’s fine haiku.

Desert Echo #haiku #tanrenga

cliff-dwelling-walnut-canyon-national-park-service1

ancient laughter
captured in a canyon wind –
yucca leaves, rustling

© Jen of Blog It Or Lose It

ancient laughter

captured in canyon wind

yucca leaves, rustling

~Jen

echoed conversation

wisdom of the ages

~mdw

This is Carpe Diem’s Tan Renga prompt for the weekend

If you are unfamiliar with the Tan Renga form,

the second “stanza” of 7-7 is an echo of another poet’s haiku

Flying Home #poetry #photography

The goal of the Tan Renga Challenge is to write the second stanza of the Tan Renga. With that two-lined stanza (classical syllables count 7-7) you complete or continue the scene/story of the first stanza. You don’t need to use the 7-7 syllables count, but feel free to do so.

Here is my attempt to complete/continue this Tan Renga started by Oliana:

power-driven fowl

in rays of a setting sun
flies home           (Oliana)
anticipate journey’s end
waiting arms of a lover
airplane wing
Carpe Diem always has great prompts for haiku and in this case Tan Renga